Disruptive Innovation – Education

Disruptive Innovation – Education

Disruptive Innovation

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — In August, four months after Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng started the online education company Coursera , its free college courses had drawn in a million users, a faster launching than either Facebook or Twitter. The co-founders, computer science professors at Stanford University, watched with amazement as enrollment passed two million last month, with 70,000 new students a week signing up for over 200 courses, including Human-Computer Interaction, Songwriting and Gamification, taught by faculty members at the company’s partners, 33 elite universities. In less than a year, Coursera has attracted $22 million in venture capital [...]

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One of the 2013 “Disruptive Innovations To Watch” was “low-cost, online, competency-based universities.”    It is exciting to sell how quickly online courses are emerging.   What will all of this mean?   It could ultimately redefine higher education.

Coursera is one of the players that is trying to refine the education business model.   It provides free training and is focusing on creating revenue streams  through certifications, licensing, and the like.   Click below to learn more.

Massive Open Online Courses Prove Popular, if Not Lucrative YetThe co-founders, computer science professors at Stanford University, watched with amazement as enrollment passed two million last month, with 70,000 new students a week signing up for over 200 courses, including Human-Computer Interaction, Songwriting and Gamification, taught by faculty members at the company’s partners, 33 elite universities. In less than a year, Coursera has attracted $22 million in venture capital and has created so much buzz that some universities sound a bit defensive about not leaping onto the bandwagon. Other approaches to online courses are emerging as well. Universities nationwide are increasing their online offerings, hoping to attract students around the world. New ventures like Udemy help individual professors put their courses online. Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have each provided $30 million to create edX. Another Stanford spinoff, Udacity, has attracted more than a million students to its menu of massive open online courses, or MOOCs, along with $15 million in financing.

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Disruptive Innovation – Education

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